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MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

SafetyFirst
New Arrival

I'd appreciate a confirmation that Southwest pilots have all been trained on how to deal with an MCAS malfunction.  From what I've read, , "The only remedy is to turn off the electric trim—which is used by the MCAS, and by trim switches on the yoke—and adjust the trim using the trim wheels." . Do you agree with this assessment?

 

I've also read that Southwest is putting secondary AOA sensors to help pilots determine the validity of the auto-pilot sensor (https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safety/southwest-airlines-is-adding-new-angle-of-attack-indicator...) though that does not solve the issue by itself. 

 

Ideally, a forecful pull-back would override MCAS - any status on if/when Beoing can make that change?

 

Thank you for your commitment to safety and addressing this valid concern head-on.

14 REPLIES 14

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

Darabin
New Arrival

I’d like to hear a response to this especially after the recent fatal crash killing all on board in Ethiopia on this type of aircraft

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

dfwskier
Top Contributor

@Darabin wrote:

I’d like to hear a response to this especially after the recent fatal crash killing all on board in Ethiopia on this type of aircraft


It's far to early to tell, but initial reports seem to indicate that something different happened on today's flight than on the earlier flight.

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

chgoflyer
Top Contributor

@dfwskier wrote:

@Darabin wrote:

I’d like to hear a response to this especially after the recent fatal crash killing all on board in Ethiopia on this type of aircraft


It's far to early to tell, but initial reports seem to indicate that something different happened on today's flight than on the earlier flight.


 

Do you have a reference? I'm seeing the opposite -- similar "roller coaster" flight pattern as the previous crash.

 

But yes. It's far too early to tell what exactly happened today. (Also, the investigation into the LionAir crash is not yet complete, so there's much still unknown there as of yet.)

 

 

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

dfwskier
Top Contributor

@chgoflyer wrote:

@dfwskier wrote:

@Darabin wrote:

I’d like to hear a response to this especially after the recent fatal crash killing all on board in Ethiopia on this type of aircraft


It's far to early to tell, but initial reports seem to indicate that something different happened on today's flight than on the earlier flight.


 

Do you have a reference?  

 


flight radar 24

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

chgoflyer
Top Contributor

That's where I (and other observers) see the similarities. 

 

Again, that data would seem to indicate a similar "roller coaster" effect we saw with LionAir, as the pilots in that crash reportedly fought the MCAS system for control of the aircraft.

 

The Striking Similarities Between Lion Air and Ethiopian 737 MAX Crashes

 

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

dfwskier
Top Contributor

@SafetyFirst wrote:

I'd appreciate a confirmation that Southwest pilots have all been trained on how to deal with an MCAS malfunction.  From what I've read, , "The only remedy is to turn off the electric trim—which is used by the MCAS, and by trim switches on the yoke—and adjust the trim using the trim wheels." . Do you agree with this assessment?

 

I don't know if that is he ONLY remedy, but it iscertainly the preferred easiest to implement remedy.

 

I've also read that Southwest is putting secondary AOA sensors to help pilots determine the validity of the auto-pilot sensor (https://theaircurrent.com/aviation-safety/southwest-airlines-is-adding-new-angle-of-attack-indicator...) though that does not solve the issue by itself. 

 

Ideally, a forecful pull-back would override MCAS - any status on if/when Beoing can make that change?

From what I've read the problem was a defective angle of attack (AOA) sensor on the pilot side of the plane that fed incorrect information to MCAS -- thus forcing the plane's nose down.  That's what was reported on earlier flights with that plane, and apparently was not fixed before the ill fated flight. Planees have two AOA sensors. There's also

one on the right side of the plane. The fix might be as simple as haviing both sensors agrees before MCAS can do anything. 

 

edit add: MCAS pushes the horizontal stabilizer down via electric motor. It would take great   contiunal strengh to overcome the motor - strength the pilot may not have possessed in the previus incident -- thus the recommendation to just switch MCAS off.

 

Thank you for your commitment to safety and addressing this valid concern head-on.


 

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

trailrunner402
New Arrival

After this latest tragedy, I will be calling Southwest in the morning to check on the type of equipment that is being used for my three upcoming reservations, and will be cancelling any 737 Max flights!  The plane should be grounded until they know why this happened!!!!

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

PHX1978
New Arrival

If Southwest's pilots have any concern about the safety of the 737 max control system, along with a 100% ability to disable the MCAS program, they should refuse to fly the max 8.  If additional training is needed to control the 737 max with it's heavier, more powerful repositioned engines, that cost should come out of Boeings bottom line and share price.

Re: MAX-8 MCAS Malfunction

mtj747
New Arrival

This is a personal observation only, but given Southwest's fleet is exclusvely 737's and the fact that they have a great track record, and the fact that they are openly talking about the issue tells me that they are taking this very seriously!