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Overbooking/Flight Change Compensation??

New Arrival

I received an email today that my travel plans were changed without my approval. Southwest took me from the 6 AM flight I had booked and bumped me to about 10 AM instead. Mind you, the flight was not cancelled, it was simply overbooked.

 

Upset, I called them looking for a way to be put back on my sold out flight because I have $250 non-refundable tickets that I have to be in Florida for no later than noon. This new flight  that they put me on would get me in at 1 PM and I wouldn't get to my hotel until probably 3 PM. 

 

I talked to about 5 people today after waiting on hold and four hours later, I talked to a guy who told me that he could "tell a supervisor to call me but they probably won't do anything." I told him that I absolutely needed to be on that flight or want to be compensated for the fact that I have to now rebooked my events and I'm out $250. I'm technically out more, but I think I can get refunds back on the other stuff. He just kept telling me they could cancel my flight entirely if I want. Uhhh .. that still doesn't help me being out $250 lol. So because Southwest overbooked, I have to be out money?? Is this even right? Can they even do that? It's not my fault they overbooked their flights! Everyone I talked to today was so unreasonable and ignorant! I know COVID has everyone going crazy, but that's just not okay! Help!!

4 REPLIES 4

Re: Overbooking/Flight Change Compensation??

Top Contributor

Sorry to hear of your problems.

 

Since Southwest changed your flight, you are entitled to one of two things

 

1) You can change to any flight on the routing with open seats at no cost - regardless of the cost of the flight you select. This is allowed up to 2 weeks before or 2 weeks after the date of the flight that was changed. I'd suggest that you check the Southwest website to see if better options are out there.

 

2) You could also tell the airline you want your money back. If you do the airline will, refund to the form of payment you used to buy the ticket.

 

Airlines move thousands of passengers to different flights every day.  None of them pay compensation when it happens in the days or weeks before a flight. On the other hand if you are at the airport and denied a seat on the plane for which you have a reservation, then denied boarding compensation is due. 

Re: Overbooking/Flight Change Compensation??

Rising Star

In that same e-mail there should have been verbiage that said you could change your flight at no cost to you but you have to do it in 72 hours. Why don't you try that instead of calling and waiting on the phone for hours? Here is the verbiage from an e-mail I got last month when one of my flights changed:

 

"In the event that this new itinerary does not work for you, we are offering the opportunity to change your flight date(s) and/or time(s) by up to 14 days from original travel date at no additional cost in accordance with our established recommendation practices. For expedited service, you can change your flight at southest.com/rebook3 within three days of the delivery of this email. Flights with no additional cost will display as "Available." 

 

I have always had an "available" flight to rebook, sometimes saving me hundreds of dollars (literally) by rebooking for free using this process!

 

And also - your original flight path / times were likely cancelled completely and no longer exists as an option, which is why you were moved to a new flight. I've never heard of a customer booking a flight, then being moved to a new flight when the original flight still exists as an option. 

 

--Jessica

Re: Overbooking/Flight Change Compensation??

Active Member

Flying in to something that is non-changeable and non-refundable a few hours before it is risky. All types of things can impact and delay flights including weather and mechanical issues. If it is important, I would fly in the day before.

Re: Overbooking/Flight Change Compensation??

Top Contributor

@bwallet wrote:

Flying in to something that is non-changeable and non-refundable a few hours before it is risky. All types of things can impact and delay flights including weather and mechanical issues. If it is important, I would fly in the day before.


Agree with you completely.

 

I learned from an early life experience. I was to run a meeting in Kansas City that was to start at 10 am. I was on a flight due to arrive at 8 am. Plenty of time, right? No. We tried to land 3 times (fog - visibility right at minimums), and failed three times. Off to Salina KS we went.

 

I finally got to MY MEETING at 1:30. I was the only one that was late. Never again.