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Refund

New Arrival

I was forced to cancel our reservation due to being a New Jersey resident flying into Florida for 6 days. Florida's law says we must quarantine 14 days upon arrival.  New Jersey's law states we are in complete lockdown. Flight was leaving from Philadelphia and we are not allowed in Philadelphia by law.  I love flying Southwest however issuing a credit versus refund is not acceptable in my mind.  We are legally and morally bound not to fly under these circumstances. Please do right by your loyal customer and give us our refund.  Thank you 

8 REPLIES 8
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Re: Refund

Active Member

If you do not plan to reschedule your flight or use the travel credit by June 2021 (very generous, I might add), you can contact Southwest and ask for a refund. 

 

Thanks,

 

Jessica

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Re: Refund

New Arrival

Jessica says if we haven't used our travel credit by June, 2021 we can contact Southwest and "ask for a refund."  Telling us we can ask for a refund verses telling us we would get a refund are two very different things.  Please clarify.  I also agree with Julieann731 and would like a refund now, not possibly after June, 2020.  Please reconsider.  

 

 

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Re: Refund

New Arrival

BTW, is Jessica a Southwest employee?

Re: Refund

Top Contributor

@jksobonya wrote:

If you do not plan to reschedule your flight or use the travel credit by June 2021 (very generous, I might add), you can contact Southwest and ask for a refund. 

 

 


They key being to reach out to Southwest directly, this is a customer-to-customer forum. 

 

The situation will be complicated if you proactively canceled your flight, and with your flight being from PHL instead of LGA - good luck, I hope it works out, but I hope you can use travel funds before next June as well in case this isn't approved.

 

Home airport MDW, frequent visitor to MCO to see the mouse.
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Re: Refund

Active Member

The government made it very clear that if airline canceled flights, even if this is due to government restrictions, then they had to give refunds. Even if it is required by the government, they still have to play by the rules. You canceled because of government rules (the government didn't make you, you just didn't like their restrictions). It only seems fair to me that you also play for the rules. You canceled, you get credit.

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Re: Refund

Top Contributor

@bwallet wrote:

The government made it very clear that if airline canceled flights, even if this is due to government restrictions, then they had to give refunds. Even if it is required by the government, they still have to play by the rules. You canceled because of government rules (the government didn't make you, you just didn't like their restrictions). It only seems fair to me that you also play for the rules. You canceled, you get credit.


 

Fair? I think in many ways the "rules" went out the window a few weeks ago. It's certainly the case with denied refunds without justification when refunds are entitled. And, sadly, many travelers simply don't know the "rules," and carriers -- even Southwest -- aren't exactly proactive at letting anyone know what those are anymore.

 

However you make a good point.

 

Do not cancel your upcoming flights. Wait and see if the carrier cancels them first.

 

If so, you are entitled to a full refund. If not, cancel the flight yourself at least 10 minutes prior to scheduled departure and you'll receive travel funds (with an extended expiration date of June 30, 2021.)

 

 

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Re: Refund

Active Member

The airlines got their hands spanked. To me, the most interesting think about the DOT statement was that the airlines could offer credit, but they could do so only have to clearly letting the passengers know that they have the option to receive a refund. It seems to me that the airlines are clearly still non-compliant in that regards.

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Re: Refund

Top Contributor

@bwallet wrote:

The airlines got their hands spanked. To me, the most interesting think about the DOT statement was that the airlines could offer credit, but they could do so only have to clearly letting the passengers know that they have the option to receive a refund. It seems to me that the airlines are clearly still non-compliant in that regards.


 

Agreed.

 

I suspect carriers are playing fast-and-loose with the rules knowingly, under the assumption that any resultant DOT fines would still cost less than granting full refunds for everyone who qualifies.

 

Strange times.